Places + Things - Brandon Vick Photography
  • IslBG
  • Tuscany Italy castle. (Photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/)
  • IslBG
  • Vigonovo riding lessons. (Photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/)
  • Riding lessons, Vigonovo, Italy, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/.
  • Paul and Michelle, Kauai, Hawaii, (Photo by Brandon Vick Weddings LLC, brandonvickweddings.com)
  • A group of young men pose for a portrait outside the Pantheon, Rome, Italy. Photo by Brandon Vick,
https://www.brandonvickphotography.com/
  • City of Venice in the Veneto region of Italy. Photo by Brandon Vick, http://www.brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Lianos dos Palmas cigar production, Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/)
  • NikSoftware demo files for Sean Dyroff.
  • Havacigar, Charleston, SC, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Charleston is the oldest and second-largest city in the southeastern State of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline and is located on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley and Cooper rivers. 

Founded in 1670 as Charles Towne in honor of King Charles II of England, Charleston adopted its present name in 1783. It moved to its present location on Oyster Point in 1680 from a location on the west bank of the Ashley River known as Albemarle Point. By 1690, Charles Towne was the fifth largest city in North America, and it remained among the ten largest cities in the United States through the 1840 census. With a 2010 census population of 120,080 (and a 2012 estimate of 125,583), current trends put Charleston as the fastest-growing municipality in South Carolina. The Charleston Metropolitan area, comprising Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties, population was counted by the 2012 estimate at 697,439 – the second largest in the state – and the 78th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States. 

Known for its rich history, well-preserved architecture, distinguished restaurants, and mannerly people, Charleston has received a large number of accolades, including "America's Most Friendly [City]" by Travel + Leisure in 2011 and in 2013 by Condé Nast Traveler, and also "the most polite and hospitable city in America" by Southern Living magazine. (Photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/)
  • A National Historic Landmark, San Xavier Mission was founded as a Catholic mission by Father Eusebio Kino in 1692. Construction of the current church began in 1783 and was completed in 1797.

The oldest intact European structure in Arizona, the church's interior is filled with marvelous original statuary and mural paintings. It is a place where visitors can truly step back in time and enter an authentic 18th Century space.

The church retains its original purpose of ministering to the religious needs of its parishioners.


Location:

The Mission is 9 miles south of downtown Tucson, Arizona just off of Interstate 19. Take exit 92 (San Xavier Road) and follow signs to the Mission.

There is no admission charge to visit Mission San Xavier. Some 200,000 visitors come each year from all over the world to view what is widely considered to be the finest example of Spanish Colonial architecture in the United States.

The History:

The current church dates from the late 1700's, when Southern Arizona was part of New Spain. In 1783, Franciscan missionary Fr. Juan Bautista Velderrain was able to begin contruction on the present structure usin money borrowed from a Sonoran rancher. He hired an architect, Ignacio Gaona, and a large workforce of O'odham to create the present church.

Following Mexican independence in 1821, San Xavier became part of Mexico. The last resident Franciscan of the 19th Century departed in 1837. With the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, the Mission joined the United States. In 1859 San Xavier became part of the Diocese of Santa Fe. In 1866 Tucson became an incipient diocese and regular services were held at the Mission once again. Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet opened a school at the Mission in 1872. Franciscan Sisters of Christian Charity now teach at the school and reside in the convent.

The Franciscans returned to the Mission in 1913. Recently, Mission San Xavier became a seperate nonprofit entity. It remains a testament to the endurance of culture thoughtout our history.

Timeline:

1692  Father Kino visits the village of Wa:k
1700  Father Kino begins foundations on a church never built
1711  Father Kino dies in Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico
1756  Father Espinosa constructs the 1st church
1767  Jesuits are expelled from New Spain
1768  Spanish Franciscans take over the Mission
1783  Construction begins on the present church
1797  The Mission church is completed
1821  Spanish Franciscans leave
1846  Cooke's Mormon battalion passes by the Mission
1854  Gadsden Purchase puts the Misison inside the United States
1859  Santa Fe diocese begins first repairs of the Mission
1887  Earthquake damages the Mission
1905  Bishop Granjon begins major repairs
1913  Franciscans return to the Mission
1939  Lightning strikes the West Tower
1953  Church facade is restored
1963  San Xavier becomes a National Historic Landmark
1978  Patronato San Xavier established to preserve the Mission
1989  Leaking walls force emergency restoration
1992  Conservators begin a 5-year rescue effort of the interior

Today the restoration continues when funds are available.

The Architecture:

Constructed of low-fire clay brick, stone and lime mortor, the entire structure is roofed with masonary vaults, making it unique among Spanish Colonial uildings within U. S. borders. The architect, Ignacio Gaona, is credited with building another church in Caborca, Sonora Mexico.

Little is known about the people who decorated the interior. The artwork was problably commissioned by Fr. Velderrain's successor and most likely created by artists from Queretero in New Spain (now Mexico). The sculpture was created in guild workshops and carried by donkey through the Pimeria Alta to its destination at the Mission. Craftsmen created gessoed clothing once the sculpture was in place.

The church contains numerous references to the Franciscan cord both on the facade and throughout the church.

The shell, a symbol of pilgrimage after the patron saint of Spain, Santiago or James the Greater, is replicated all through the structure in window treatments, the sanctuary, the facade and other details within the interior.

The Baroque architecture style features playful dramatic elements such as theatrical curtain displays, faux doors, marbleing, and overall sense of balance.

The Restoration:

An earthquake in 1887 knocked down the mortuary wall and damaged parts of the church. Extensive repairs began in 1905, under Bishop Henry Granjon. The next round of restoration followed the years after 1939 when a lightening strike hit the West Tower lantern.

A group of community leaders formed the Patronanto San Xavier in 1978 to promote the conservation of Mission San Xavier. Shortly after a comprehensive study of its condition was completed, water seeped into the west wall of the church's sanctuary, forcing an emergency conservation effort by the Patronato. In a five-year program, an international team of conservators cleaned, removed over-painting, and repaired the interior painted and sculptured art of Mission San Xavier del Bac.

The Patronato continues exterior preservation work begun in 1989. Its restoration team is removing the earlier coating of cement plaster, repairing the historic brick beneath, and
re-finishing the exterior surface with a traditional lime plaster. The sooner the cement can be removed, the greater the amount of original fabric can be preserved. More remains to be done if we are to guarantee this landmark for future generations. Please help us preserve this national treasure.
  • A National Historic Landmark, San Xavier Mission was founded as a Catholic mission by Father Eusebio Kino in 1692. Construction of the current church began in 1783 and was completed in 1797.

The oldest intact European structure in Arizona, the church's interior is filled with marvelous original statuary and mural paintings. It is a place where visitors can truly step back in time and enter an authentic 18th Century space.

The church retains its original purpose of ministering to the religious needs of its parishioners.


Location:

The Mission is 9 miles south of downtown Tucson, Arizona just off of Interstate 19. Take exit 92 (San Xavier Road) and follow signs to the Mission.

There is no admission charge to visit Mission San Xavier. Some 200,000 visitors come each year from all over the world to view what is widely considered to be the finest example of Spanish Colonial architecture in the United States.

The History:

The current church dates from the late 1700's, when Southern Arizona was part of New Spain. In 1783, Franciscan missionary Fr. Juan Bautista Velderrain was able to begin contruction on the present structure usin money borrowed from a Sonoran rancher. He hired an architect, Ignacio Gaona, and a large workforce of O'odham to create the present church.

Following Mexican independence in 1821, San Xavier became part of Mexico. The last resident Franciscan of the 19th Century departed in 1837. With the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, the Mission joined the United States. In 1859 San Xavier became part of the Diocese of Santa Fe. In 1866 Tucson became an incipient diocese and regular services were held at the Mission once again. Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet opened a school at the Mission in 1872. Franciscan Sisters of Christian Charity now teach at the school and reside in the convent.

The Franciscans returned to the Mission in 1913. Recently, Mission San Xavier became a seperate nonprofit entity. It remains a testament to the endurance of culture thoughtout our history.

Timeline:

1692  Father Kino visits the village of Wa:k
1700  Father Kino begins foundations on a church never built
1711  Father Kino dies in Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico
1756  Father Espinosa constructs the 1st church
1767  Jesuits are expelled from New Spain
1768  Spanish Franciscans take over the Mission
1783  Construction begins on the present church
1797  The Mission church is completed
1821  Spanish Franciscans leave
1846  Cooke's Mormon battalion passes by the Mission
1854  Gadsden Purchase puts the Misison inside the United States
1859  Santa Fe diocese begins first repairs of the Mission
1887  Earthquake damages the Mission
1905  Bishop Granjon begins major repairs
1913  Franciscans return to the Mission
1939  Lightning strikes the West Tower
1953  Church facade is restored
1963  San Xavier becomes a National Historic Landmark
1978  Patronato San Xavier established to preserve the Mission
1989  Leaking walls force emergency restoration
1992  Conservators begin a 5-year rescue effort of the interior

Today the restoration continues when funds are available.

The Architecture:

Constructed of low-fire clay brick, stone and lime mortor, the entire structure is roofed with masonary vaults, making it unique among Spanish Colonial uildings within U. S. borders. The architect, Ignacio Gaona, is credited with building another church in Caborca, Sonora Mexico.

Little is known about the people who decorated the interior. The artwork was problably commissioned by Fr. Velderrain's successor and most likely created by artists from Queretero in New Spain (now Mexico). The sculpture was created in guild workshops and carried by donkey through the Pimeria Alta to its destination at the Mission. Craftsmen created gessoed clothing once the sculpture was in place.

The church contains numerous references to the Franciscan cord both on the facade and throughout the church.

The shell, a symbol of pilgrimage after the patron saint of Spain, Santiago or James the Greater, is replicated all through the structure in window treatments, the sanctuary, the facade and other details within the interior.

The Baroque architecture style features playful dramatic elements such as theatrical curtain displays, faux doors, marbleing, and overall sense of balance.

The Restoration:

An earthquake in 1887 knocked down the mortuary wall and damaged parts of the church. Extensive repairs began in 1905, under Bishop Henry Granjon. The next round of restoration followed the years after 1939 when a lightening strike hit the West Tower lantern.

A group of community leaders formed the Patronanto San Xavier in 1978 to promote the conservation of Mission San Xavier. Shortly after a comprehensive study of its condition was completed, water seeped into the west wall of the church's sanctuary, forcing an emergency conservation effort by the Patronato. In a five-year program, an international team of conservators cleaned, removed over-painting, and repaired the interior painted and sculptured art of Mission San Xavier del Bac.

The Patronato continues exterior preservation work begun in 1989. Its restoration team is removing the earlier coating of cement plaster, repairing the historic brick beneath, and
re-finishing the exterior surface with a traditional lime plaster. The sooner the cement can be removed, the greater the amount of original fabric can be preserved. More remains to be done if we are to guarantee this landmark for future generations. Please help us preserve this national treasure.
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/
  • Istanbul Turkey, photo by Brandon Vick Photography LLC, http://brandonvickphotography.com/

Brandon Vick is a Rochester, N.Y., photographer that specializes in providing his clients with stylish and elegant portrait, food, and travel photography. Brandon travels frequently for assignments and has photographed everything from weddings in Hawaii and Istanbul to food and horses in Italy and Japan. Brandon has recently documented the spiritual pilgrimage and canonization of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha in Vatican City, Rome.

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